Just Get Started

I tend to set myself up for defeat with how my brain works when trying to accomplish a task. I overthink things.

When I pull a task from my list of things to do a process starts in my head. I visualize the task and then try to figure out what the solution is and how it looks at the end. Smaller tasks with a clear goal seem to start just fine. Tasks that are a bit more nebulous or aren’t clear how to do everything end up stalling. I end up wasting time misdirecting myself so I don’t have to face the fact that I don’t have an immediate solution.

I also tend to misdirect myself with tasks that have a clear solution but aren’t terribly exciting. It takes a serious conscious effort for me to keep a grasp on things that tend to be mundane but are a part of my day.

While my focus on this post is generally around my job it applies to how I approach things with my personal life too. Unimportant or difficult tasks tend to get stalled and I will find myself doing other things (like cleaning, checking out Facebook, the weather…) just to not face the task at hand.

So … Just Start.

So how do I get over this fear of working on a task?

Just start.

just-start-crop

Sounds simple, right? It boils down to these things:

  • If this is a larger task admit you can’t see the end and just find the first small chunk you can work on. Smaller tasks are easier to finish and it lets your unconscious noodle on the entire project in the meantime.
  • Turn off the distractions and be cognizant of when you misdirect yourself. Try to figure out a pattern to what causes it and stop it before it happens.
  • If this a task that’s just not engaging or not exciting but its something you need to do, just start. Once you get moving and you prevent the misdirection you’ll finish and feel good.
  • Celebrate the finished tasks.

 

3 thoughts on “Just Get Started

  1. What really helps me is setting a very short time limit like ten minutes.

    “Just work on this hard thing for ten minutes and then you’re free to do something else again!”

    Often that’s enough for me to lose myself in the task (in a good way) and complete it. When that doesn’t work I come back to it a few hours or a day later, again for ten minutes. Most things then give way when you hammer at them regularly.

    Like

  2. Pingback: I am a procrastinator. – The Dangling Pointer

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